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Weekend Reading

The IPS news agency have published more articles on Albania. A couple of articles look at the relationship between tourism and the environment. Another looks at the similarities between Albania and other countries in the region. Then there is an interview with Jozefina Topalli, Speaker of the Parliament and lastly a piece on Tirana.

Elsewhere, the IHT reports that attempts to elect a President are still going nowhere. Also going nowhere is the power supply situation with long blackouts anticipated in September. In the Southeast European Times Robert Austin suggests that the longer term outlook may be brighter following the appointment of a new director of KESH, Xherxh Bojaxhi.

I can confirm Austin's claim that Bojaxhi takes to the field with his staff since he turned up to read my electricity meter last week. (It's not that I'm special. It's just that the day before I had refused to allow his staff to do so on the perfectly reasonable grounds that none of them had any identification.)

Finally, BIRN reports that President Clinton has accepted the invitation to visit Albania and may be coming here as soon as early autumn. I hope you didn't throw away your flags and hats.


Anonymous said…
Thanks for the update about the election of President. I try to follow the issue by reading Albanian newspapers but everything is so confusing in the way they report.

Your blog has become a daily read. Sort of an unofficial Albanian News Agency (where is ATSH website when you need it?).
ローラ said…
it's funny that "bojaxhi" showed up to read your meter. you know, because of the name.
our man said…
Lolers - I'm afraid I don't understand. Can you explain?

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Welcome to Our Man in Tirana. I moved to Tirana, capital of Albania, in October 2005 and left in October 2007. This blog is a mix of photographs, reports, links, impressions and, undoubtedly, prejudices relating to the city and the country.

Since I am no longer in Tirana I am no longer updating this blog. However, there are over 300 posts covering this two year period and I hope that they are still of some interest.

So if you are curious about Albania or if you are planning to visit I hope this blog will be of value.


And now the end is near
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Never did like that crappy song.

But it's true nevertheless.

Tomorrow in the wee hours of the morning we will be heading for the airport for the last time. I suppose it was too much to expect that I could have kept this going while getting ready to leave. So apologies for the lack of postings over the last weeks. This is post number 380 something so I suppose one post every two days is not a bad average.

There were probably 380 more in my head or scribbled down on scraps of paper, but many of them are perhaps best left there.

I suppose I should be penning - or typing - my final thoughts and reflections on two years in Tirana, but right now I don't have any. Maybe in a month or two though I might come back with something.

Thanks to all of you who have read this blog - especially those of you who have become regulars. Thanks also for linking and thanks to all who left comments.

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