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The Washington Post has a lengthy article on the phenomenon of sworn virgins. Elvira Dones, an Albanian born author and journalist has recently made a film on this theme.

Also looking at women in Albanian society, Nicole Itano reports for Women's eNews on the experience of Roma women.

MSNBC carries an FT report on the problems facing small businesses in Albania trying to cope with hours-long power cuts every day. The report quotes the Prime Minister's claims that Albania has reached a 'turning point' and that within four years the country will be exporting electricity.

The Economist has a piece on President Topi. The author believes that the President will support measures to limit the term of office for the Chief Prosecutor, thus dealing with the Sollaku issue. In contrast to the Prime Minister's optimism, the Economist reports that 'plans for private investors to build new power plants are way behind schedule.'

Forbes carries an AP story on US attempts to persuade the Canadians to take the Uighurs from the Guantanamo interment camp who were eventually resettled in Albania. The report claims that the US authorities are continuing to meet with the Canadians to discuss the fate of 17 other Uighurs held at Guantanamo, but with little success.

A BBC piece on Uighurs in Kazhakstan from July provides some useful background on the Uighurs and their relationship with the Chinese state.

Finally, Senator Richard Lugar holds up Albania as a success story for the Nunn-Lugar Act, a post cold war piece of legislation co-sponsored by the Senator that provides funds and know-how for the disposal of WMD.

Comments

nick said…
its funny, i read that story in the economist, on top channel, translated in albanian, and the translation was a bit off...lol. Of all the articles though, thats the only one that most albos care about...not a lot of interest in wmd's, romas, uighurs or what not.
Anonymous said…
That woman from Washington Post's video did not strike me as 'sworn' anything.

At best she just likes to wear men's clothing, at worst she's a lesbian.

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