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ITS said…
That's hilarious. Who says that Albanians ain't got a sense of humor?
Anonymous said…
gosh that's ugly...
do the tenats like it or they had no choice?
that is butt ugly, sorry.
Anonymous said…
Welcome to Albania... of course you have no choice.
Our mayor must have a ridiculous amount of free time to do this. Apparently everything is going so well in Tirana that he doesn’t have to spend any time resolving issues such as sewage and water and garbage and transportation and roads and unemployment and taxes and ... oh I almost forgot - also running that stupid Socialist Party.
The last one fits him the best though…
Selfmaderadio said…
ugly! I wouldn't like to live in it.
eni said…
don't find it that much ugly! maybe not esthetic but not that terrific you know!
however Edi can do better I guess:)
Anonymous said…
think is great!
Is better than the ugly grey from the past, that's for shore. Some are just blind, or maybe there spirit are full off "grey" from the past!!
Rama is doing a great job and with the water supplies agencies going under him, the people with see the difference very soon. I just hope the government start thinking about the real problems off the people and stop the hate campaign against anything that involve Rama.
More collaboration and less anger.
Anonymous said…
very very nice......great job!!!
he trasform the grey of the past,in the simbol of changing of the new city of tirana in europe!!!
go go tirana go!!!
Anonymous said…
I kid u not, I think it resembles a RIO neighborhood(b/w the slums and the Copacabana)...too bad I dont have any pics of that!
Anonymous said…
That is some great work! I agree that it takes a bit of a sense of humor.
Anonymous said…
Humor can only take you so far, before you start feeling that the joke's on you, the citizen! I wouldn't want to live in a Barbie building like that, I would feel as if the mayor put us all in the kindergarten and painted the walls to match our mental age. How many inhabitants would identify with these psychedelic escapades, and how long (weeks? months?) before these paintings get old and tiring to the people who live there everyday? People want the city to take the trash out of the courtyard, the mayor instead paints their building with childish motives. They don't have water to bathe, but luckily they now have the image/illusion of laundry drying outside of their balcony, how ironic!
And this cheap, Afrikanish "art" is getting really insulting. Rama has made gazillions selling building permits, how about he invests in some real art to show his gratitude to the people who kept him 8+ years in power.
Anonymous said…
such a sad sight
I think it's just original. I don't know of any other place/city or country for that matter that has done this on their buildings. Bottom line: Cheap and original :-)
candyland said…
Maybe the idea was good to begin with but the results are so disappointing. Totally ugly in my opinion. I'm all for throwing some colors into the canvas but this is not art.
olli said…
Didn't realise it would be so controversial.

Like most of the painted buildings here it is eyecatching and funny the first time but soon you stop even noticing - especially when the pollution starts to fade and obscure the colours.
Anonymous said…
I read you blog since we have the new that my boyfriend get a place as spanish teacher in Tirana's university. He is leaving next wednesday and we are very excited. I will join him first october. First of all he has to find an appartment, and I really don't mind if it's one of these collored buildings (mostly cause we lived in a big gray blok in Bucarest for three years...)
Regards from Madrid, maybe we meet some day...
belle_fleur said…
Such things happens only in Albania! I look at these pictures and it reminds me of one of the orphanages in Vlora and the walls were painted with such bright colors and make a pleasant environment for the orphans. I feel that Edi tries to keep the citizens "entertaint" since he isn't taking care of the main issues that the people are facing in Tirana, making them believe that he is looking after their needs, pffffffffffff
Albiqete said…
have you people heard the term 'modern art'
and why not make something unique Great job Edi even though I hate he is a PS leader. his grandfather was a fashist what a strange twist
Dimitri said…
I didn't even think someone might dislike it... Great idea, my congratulations to the author! Very funny and cozy. What is really said, though, is the crooked roof and the collapsing chimneys. Anyway, people who live in ruins and paint their buildings like this, must be really good-natured and kind. Well done, Albanians!
Anonymous said…
I love it. It has brught some light to that street. It catches your eye immediatly and it looks much better in real life than in the pics. And not to think of how it used to look before. Tirana may not be a beautiful city and with a strong architecture past but at least it has started to look colorful. If you go to other cities like Belgrade, Sofia, Bukurest, Vienna even, you will be sorrounded by grayness everywhere, which brings a sudden sadness to state of being. So I say, more colors, the better and more creativity to best.

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