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An Oligarch of Albanian Politics

Don't ask me what's going on with Albanian politics. I have no idea. If anyone out there can explain in fewer than 250 words let me know.

In the absence of any profound - or even superficial - analysis from me, here is a report from Albanian Economy News offering its take on the recent meeting between new best friends, Fatos Nano and Sali Berisha.

Comments

Ll.T. said…
Alwyn, Albanian politicis is a simple sport with two main players and a whole bunch of smaller ones who are of almost no importance. Every once in a while somebody new tries to cut in and get on the dance floor but the two, even though nominal enemies, join forces and quickly kick the newcomer out.

In addition to the two big boys and the many, many smaller ones, there's also the public who has been reduced to the pathetic job of electing to power the lesser of the two evils every few years.

Now, count my words :)
olli said…
I make that 96. Good job!
Anonymous said…
There is this french film "8 women", whose ansemble, 8 women won the Cannes film festival acting price. These 8 women are kind of prisoners of each-other. LIfe never breaks the circle of these 8 women, or life comes just around with 8 women. There are 2 of them (one of them is played by Caterine Denevue) that go like mad on each other, heating and beating, yelling and screeming, heating and beating, hurting till they almost reach the point of killing each-other. But then, suddenly, they start kissing each-other, touching the bodies and breasts, go completely sexual for as long as they previously fought. They leave each other with a kind of a mutual compromise. But, after a while, when they meet again, they start from the begining the above described ritual.
The albanian politicians represent the male version of this story.
ITS said…
A lot of people in Albania say that we need new blood in politics. We need young people. We need to replace the old.

The reality is that politics are played by old guys all over the world, and these guys hold all the power, and have all sorts of tricks up their sleeves.

The only way that you are going to separate the old from politics is by the course of life, and natural death.

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