Skip to main content

A Different View on Greater Albania

Responding to the article in the Economist I mentioned in a previous post, someone left a comment referring me to the report of the International Commission on the Balkans. The Commission's research suggested that Albanians in both Albania and Kosovo are much more open to the possibility of unity than the Economist article claims. Below are the Commission's conclusions in written and graphical form.
According to the survey, the breakdown of Macedonia and the establishment of a Greater Albania are two developments that could destabilise the region. The results of the survey show a relatively high acceptance of the idea of a "Greater Albania" among the Albanian populations of both Kosovo and Albania. As a whole, they differ from other groups in the region in their view that a future unification of Kosovo and Albania is both desirable and possible (figure 6). This suggests that the process of nation-building among Albanian communities in the Balkans is still in progress. If the international community fails to offer a convincing European perspective to the region, it might bolster support for a Greater Albania or a Greater Kosovo among Albanians. The international community should send a clear message that Greater Albania or Greater Kosovo is not an option.

Comments

Anonymous said…
That's hardly surprising to anyone. Did they expect that Albanians would be on the same level as the Serbians? I bet you could replace Greater Albania with Greater Serbia, Albanians with Serbians, and you'd get the same graph.
Anonymous said…
I don't know what the previous writer means by "the same level". Anyway, the biggest problem with the Balkan countries has always been on who shouts more, and shows more identity, even when they have to borrow it.
I don't see any point, when it comes to the idea of a greater Albania. Even though it might be flattering, I still believe in the identity of each Albanian community within the borders of each country, i.e. Macedonia, Montenegro. Both countries have mixed communities, and if the Albanian part is taken out, we risk in loosing the equilibrium, and their existence. Kosovo as an independent country will have to be the last piece in the southeastern european puzzle.
The future stands in EU for each of these nations, and that, de facto is a union.
Anonymous said…
i have to wonder if the report is mixing terms here. there is a great desire by many albanians of a unification of any sort with kosovo but not the creation of a greater albnia involving any other countries.
Anonymous said…
Those who deal within the universe of marketing know the difference between 'a branded house' and 'house of brands'.

There are brands of Albanians yes! You have your nationalists in Kosov. You have your oportunists in Albania. You have your islamists in FYROM. You have your catholics in Montenegro/Highlands.

However they all belong to the same house and must be under the same roof. The wheels of this vision were set in motion by Italian-Albanians 2 centuries ago.

It flies in the face of the modern 'multi-cultural' paradigm..yes. But that paradigm is a sham anyway.
Ll.T. said…
As the Italians say, "give time to time"; the wheel is slowly, very slowly turning in our favor.......
Anonymous said…
You would have to be a moron to agree with this crap.
Greater Albania would mean Albania taking over other lands and expulsing the people and have Albanians settle in.
This what the Greeks did after WW2 but it wasn't called a Greater Greece.
Serbia is trying and has done this. they took Vojvodina and expelled Hungarians and treated them as second class citizens on their land. They tried it with Kosovo.
For Albanians this would not be creating a greater Albania but to Albanians this is establishing an Ethnic Albania. You see the difference.
Look people Albanians are not Slavs nor are they Greek. Albanians have enemies on all sides of the borders. Other ethnic groups tried to assimilate Albanians, by changing their names, by taking Albanian land, by taking away the Albanian culture or stealing the Albanian culture and kill Albanians. Albanians are not in it for power, Albanians are in for their indeities and culture. A culture that is purely Albanian without Slavic or Greek influence.

Popular posts from this blog

Dy Rame Per Tirane

I was watching Top Channel last night, first the news, then Fiks Fare. According to them Tirana's citizens now have a choice not only between Rama and Olldashi, but also between Rama and Rama. A minor right-wing faction, Parti 'Balli Kombetar' , submitted papers to the election authorities registering their candidate, Akile Rama. The people on Fiks Fare got hold of the papers and sent a reporter and camera team to the address listed for Mr A Rama. After much ringing of the bell the gate was reluctantly opened by a middle-aged woman who refused to speak to the reporter and tried to close the gate on her. Back in the studio Saimiri and Doctori - the two presenters of Fiks Fare - revealed that Mr Akile Rama was 73 years old, in hospital, and did not know he was now a candidate for mayor. They also compared two documents - the papers submitted on his behalf, and a genuine document he had signed. The signatures were not even remotely similar. There was an interview with the lea

Big in Albania

Ask me how much I knew about Albania before coming here and my list would be a short one: Enver Hoxha, bunkers and Sir Norman Wisdom. I have no idea when or how I acquired this extensive body of knowledge, but the association of Norman Wisdom with Albania was by far the most interesting part of it. I remember watching Norman Wisdom's old films on British television. My parents were fans of his wholesome, slapstick comedy, but apparently missed the ideological significance of Pitkin's relationship with Mr Grimsdale. Pitkin, the downtrodden and oppressed representative of the workers, triumphed every time over his capitalist oppressor, Mr Grimsdale - and he got the girl. It took a theorist of Hoxha's insight and profundity to discern this deeper political message. It always seemed tremendously unlikely, yet the story of Sir Norman's fame in Albania has been reported in worthy sources like the BBC , the Guardian and the Daily Telegraph . According to the Guardian, when Wi

Guide Turistike

According to the World Travel and Tourism Council , the future is bright for Albania. The Council ranks Albania ninth out of 174 countries for tourism growth over the next ten years. A summary of the Council's report is available, as is the full report complete with many pages of graphs, charts and spreadsheets. This summer I have seen a number of tourists on the streets of Tirana. Some of them may well be Albanian expats, or people of Albanian descent returning home to visit family, but others are genuine 'foreigners'. Judging from their appearance, they are probably best described as 'independent travellers' - the kind of people who are not interested in luxury hotels or crowded beaches. This is a good start, but independent travellers are not the kind of big spenders that the tourist industry likes. In the longer term, if Albania wants to bring in the kind of free-spending tourists who currently holiday in Croatia or Slovenia, there will have to be a huge inv