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Shtepia e Kafese

Every time we visit IKEA I come back with a bag full of coffee. The strong dark Skanerost is my favourite, with the milder Mellanmork offering a little variety. The Scandinavians know a thing or two about coffee - so black you can't see the bottom of the cup; so thick you could trot a mouse across it.

Here in Albania, though, filter coffee - or, as it is sometimes known for no good reason, 'American coffee' - is very definitely the poor relation. Albanians prefer their coffee the Italian or, to a lesser extent, the Turkish way. And many places certainly do a very good espresso.

Inevitably, my coffee drinking habits have changed. Now, when I am out, I regularly drink espresso - something I never did before. For me, the thought of putting sugar in coffee was shocking. While at home, I have my supply of Skanerost to keep me satisfied.

Yet when my supplies run low, the thought of a seven or eight hour drive to Thessaloniki to restock is hardly appealing. So, I was intrigued when, just before Christmas, I happened to be walking down a street near Komuna e Parisit and saw new signs on a formerly empty corner store that read 'Shtepia e Kafese' - House of Coffee.

Yesterday, I took a walk down the same street and called in at the newly opened shop. Nicaraguan, Colombian, Kenyan and a reasonably good range of other beans are available, ground to order. I ordered some of the Kenyan and as well as tasting good, the freshly ground beans have filled the entire house with their fine aroma.

As well as coffee, the shop also carries a range of other goodies - dried fruits, pastries, sweets and candies, wines and more besides. It is a great little shop and I will definitely be visiting regularly.

Comments

Ll.T. said…
What, you haven't started drinking "turkish coffee" yet? If you're lucky enough you'll even have your fortune read :)
Anonymous said…
i can imagine for foreigners coming to Alb is a bit hard to find products and services they are used to the way they are used to.
You can find quality products, you jsut don't knwo where they sell them because the best stores usually are in places that don't look like stores at all. With time, hopefully you will get accustomed to the life there.
I love Ikea food, products and coffee, too!!!
Anonymous said…
And I miss Albanian Italian way coffee in Paris because here you can get something between American coffee and espresso light French way coffee.
olli said…
Don't like the grit in the bottom of turkish/greek coffee. Not sure I want to know what my fortune is either.

Anon - if you know of any other good stores you think I should visit let me know.

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